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by Katy Purviance on 03/25/08 @ 10:33:09 pm
Categories: Products, Articles | 684 words | 1197 views

I love my new subscription to Coastal Living magazine. It’s like if you took Architectural Digest and scraped off all the fussy arrogance and gilt (but kept the price tag).

A couple of days ago I told you about this article I read in my latest issue of Coastal Living magazine by Allen B. Bunting. So I went onto Coastal Living’s website and I found some more of Allen’s recommendations.

INSULATION
According to the National Audubon Society’s energy guide, properly insulating your home can save up to $135 in energy costs per year. With concerns about indoor air quality (IAQ) and energy efficiency on the rise, some manufacturers heed the call with eco- and health-friendly options at prices often comparable to conventional insulations.

BioBased Systems’ BioBased 501 spray-in insulation (a soy-based polyurethane foam) expands to fill cracks and crevices, creating an airtight seal with high thermal resistance.

• Made almost entirely from postindustrial cotton and denim fibers, Bonded Logic Inc.’s UltraTouch batting contains no chemical irritants.

CertainTeed’s GreenGuard-certified InsulSafe SP blow-in insulation is odor- and formaldehyde-free.

Johns Manville’s Spider fiberglass insulation resists mold and is formaldehyde-free.

ROOFING
When it comes to roofing, durable, eco-friendly alternatives such as slate, metal, and composite- or recycled-material tiles deliver looks and performance.

EcoStar’s Majestic Slate Traditional tiles are a resource-friendly alternative to slate. Made from recycled plastic and rubber, the durable tiles have superior fire- and impact-resistance ratings; available in nine colors.

Re-New Wood Eco-Shake shingles (made from 100 percent recycled vinyl and cellulose fiber) resist fading, are fire-retardant, and can withstand extreme weather conditions.

• Made from 98 percent post-consumer recycled metals, Rustic Shingles mimic the look of wood shake shingles, but will never warp, crack, or mold.

WINDOWS & DOORS
If you’re in the market for new windows and doors, look for models with a low U-Factor (the measurement of a window’s heat flow). On average, U-Factor values range from 0.25 to 1.25. Even better, save energy and dollars by sealing air leaks around existing windows and doors with caulk.

Andersen’s 400 Series windows feature dual-pane glass with an argon chamber for added insulation. High-performance low-E4 glass, according to the company, makes the windows up to 41 percent more energy-efficient than standard.

JELD-WEN’s moisture-resistant AuraLast wood windows and doors are manufactured using a water-based treatment that vastly decreases volatile organic compounds.

Pella’s Designer Series patio doors and windows have double- or triple-pane glass to cut heating/cooling costs and to keep between-the-glass shades safe and dust-free.

CABINETRY
Green up your kitchen or bathroom with eco-friendly cabinetry, available in a variety of styles and finishes.

• Made from plywood that is LEED-certified, Greenway Cabinetry Inc.’s Breathe Easy kitchen and bathroom cabinets are formaldehyde-free, and use only water-based glues and low- to no-VOC finishes.

Neil Kelly Cabinets’ Naturals Collection includes clean-lined cabinets made from recycled and Forest Stewardship Council–certified wood; they’re available in low-VOC paint finishes such as Buttermilk, Gingham, Pale Lavender, or in natural oil or wax.

For unique and resource-conscious drawer and cabinet pulls, try one of the following:

Aurora Glass pulls, hand-made from 100 percent recycled glass.

Schaub & Company’s Michigan Naturals knobs, made from Great Lakes stones and 100 percent recycled brass.

KITCHEN & LAUNDRY APPLIANCES
Bosch’s 800 Series Evolution dishwasher is equipped with a condensation drying system that eliminates the need for an active drying agent.

• For small kitchens, consider space-saving options such as Fisher & Paykel’s Double DishDrawer. You can run one drawer at a time to accommodate smaller loads and minimize energy, water, and detergent usage.

Maytag’s Epic high-efficiency front-loading washer is Energy Star–certified and features automatic water-level sensor and temperature control.

Fisher & Paykel’s top-loading AquaSmart washer and AeroSmart dryer are energy- and water-efficient.

FIREPLACES
Energy-efficient fireplaces can supply heat to a room without the electrical costs.

Lennox Hearth Product’s Country Collection stoves (formerly Country Stoves) are EPA Phase II–certified for clean, efficient burning, and are available in wood- and pellet-burning models.

Miles Industries’ fireplaces do not require an electrical hook-up to provide energy-efficient radiant heat; remote control and programmable options are also available.

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places where you could probably learn more about designing and building in just a few days than I did after a year of grad school

Know of some others I can add here? Let me know. Have you already visited some of these places...or planning on it? Let me know and I will feature your story and your photos here!

I am starting a new kind of architecture school. Unlike most architecture schools, you wouldn't have to submit GRE scores or good grades or letters of recommendation. You wouldn't have to put the rest of your life on hold for 3 to 5 years. You wouldn't have to accrue tens of thousands of dollars in debt. At my architecture school, anyone could come for a few weeks and learn how to build a house with their own two hands. My teachers would take skills and concepts from some of these other workshops I've listed above... except classes would be held year-round to make it easy to fit into your schedule. I would have a number of different campuses around the country that would teach building designs appropriate to the local climate. And I need your help. Can you donate land for a campus? Can you dotate books for a library? Can you teach a workshop? Can you provide start-up capital? Let me know.

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